VANCOUVER CITY APPROVES RESIDENTIAL MASS TIMBER BUILDINGS
TO 12 STOREYS

LAST LVL PANEL LIFTED IN SERVICE DEEMED ESSENTIAL BY CANADIAN PROVINCE

Higher and higher… artist’s impression of Adera Development’s Crest residential mass timber project in North Vancouver.

THE British Columbia’s Council of Forest Industries has applauded the decision by the Vancouver City Council to approve by-law amendments allowing mass timber construction up to 12 storeys for residential and commercial use as of July 1.

COFI president and CEO Susan Yurkovich said the city had taken an important step, seizing Vancouver’s green building opportunity while also supporting an industry that is a cornerstone of the province’s economy.

“Giving the green light to building taller wood buildings is advancing Vancouver’s work to combat climate change and supporting forestry-related jobs right,” Ms Yurkovich said.

She added that building with sustainably harvested, renewable, low-carbon wood products was a safe go-to solution in jurisdictions around the world looking to reduce their GHG footprint.

Last week, Adera Development ‘topped-off’ one of the largest mass timber residential projects in western Canada in the Central Lonsdale district.

With construction deemed an essential service during the COVID-19 pandemic by the province of British Columbia, Crest’s construction team has successfully and safely continued to work over the last few months and on May 28 the team placed the final CLT panel on the second building at Crest in North Vancouver, a key component of Adera’s SmartWood technology method.

Adera’s vice-president, sales and marketing, Eric Andreasen said the company remained confident that well-located, well-built, sustainable new homes would continue to succeed in this market.

The appetite and interest around large-scale mass timber projects continues to expand in North America with Adera and the Greater Vancouver building industry at the forefront of the movement towards cleaner, healthier buildings that fight against climate change.

The mass timber for the project is manufactured by Penticton-based Structurlam Mass Timber Corporation, which provided CrossLam CLT and Glulam PLUS. The timber at the building sequesters more than 433,000 kg of carbon from the atmosphere, stored for the duration of the building’s life cycle. The lumber is sourced from regional forests and is certified by the Forest Stewardship Council.

Owners who work from home will also benefit from Adera’s QuietHome system, which uses SmartWood to reduce sound transference in the building.

Crest will also feature several permanent public art installations around the exterior of the building. The project will also deliver an innovative urban dog park for the use of residents and the surrounding community.